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In The News

Massachusetts begins round two in its fight to tax millionaires

Inequality.org, April 12, 2019

“At stake is fundamental fairness,” Marie-Frances Rivera, president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center told the committee. The funds could be used, Rivera said, to fix the to be structurally deficient or to fund public transit. Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center senior analyst Phineas Baxandall explained that the millionaire tax could help “right-side” the state’s unfair tax structure. The current top 1 percent of income earners pay only 6.8 percent of their income in taxes, according to research from the Institute for Taxation and Economic Policy. The Fair Share Amendment would increase their tax burden to about 8 to 8.5 percent, bringing them level with the current range of the top 5 percent of income earners.

Massachusetts Legislators All Ears for Millionaires' Tax

New Boston Post, April 11, 2019

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, which supports the Millionaires’ Tax, says that when you combine state income taxes, state sales tax, and local property taxes, households with the lowest incomes tend to pay a larger percentage of their incomes in taxes than households with higher incomes.

The Utter Inadequacy of America’s Efforts to Desegregate Schools

The Atlantic, April 11, 2019

Massachusetts schools are already underfunded by about $1 billion, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, a left-leaning think tank, and the state hasn’t been able to figure out a way to bring in more cash. It has a flat income tax, and five previous efforts to get voters to amend the state constitution and change this have failed.

Revenue advocates disappointed by House leaders' caution on new taxes

State House News Service, April 10, 2019

Marie-Frances Rivera, president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, said that her organization appreciates the "thoughtful approach" the House plans to take on revenue but panned the budget plan itself, with no associated revenue boosters, as unhelpful. "Moving the needle on current priorities -- from education and transportation, to affordable housing and other services -- means giving serious consideration to sustainable, adequate, and progressive revenue options," Rivera said in a statement. "The House Ways and Means Committee budget proposal would make it nearly impossible for lawmakers to support our Commonwealth's priorities in any meaningful way in the coming fiscal year."

6 Things To Know About The Proposed State Budget

WGBH, April 10, 2019

Marie-Frances Rivera, president of the tax-inclined budget watch group MassBudget, said the by-the-books Michlewitz budget "would make it nearly impossible for lawmakers to support our Commonwealth's priorities in any meaningful way in the coming fiscal year." "But moving the needle on current priorities — from education and transportation, to affordable housing and other services — means giving serious consideration to sustainable, adequate, and progressive revenue options," Rivera said.

Even with 'free tuition' equity can be elusive

Boston Globe, April 4, 2019

We support this position wholeheartedly, and see this as an important first step in addressing the inequity evidenced in the report by Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. MassBudget also deserves praise for its valuable research and equity lens.

Tax Cuts in Massachusetts Have Led To $4 Billion-Plus in ‘Lost Revenue,’ Liberal Group Says

New Boston Post, March 28, 2019

A report issued by the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center highlights decreases in personal income tax (from 5.95 percent to 5.05 percent), long-term capital gains tax (from 6 percent to 5.05 percent), and dividend and interest income from stocks and savings accounts (12 percent to 5.05 percent); and an increase in the personal exemption for state income tax (from $2,200 to $4,400 for single filers and from $4,400 to $8,800 for married couples).

Tuition-free college still has its caveats, report says

Boston Globe, March 28, 2019

Programs that cover the cost of college tuition for low-income families provide students with a leg-up on a better future, but more needs to be done to make them more accessible, according to a new report. Minority, adult, and immigrant students could end up being excluded, the report by Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center says.

House, Senate Differ on Approach to Tax Policy

State House News Service, March 27, 2019

He could not be reached for comment on Wednesday, but he told the Globe that membership will likely include representatives from Associated Industries of Massachusetts, the Massachusetts Business Roundtable, chambers of commerce, think tanks like the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center and Raise Up Massachusetts, which was behind last year's "millionaires tax" proposal.

Lawmakers will examine state's taxes — including new revenue

Boston Globe, March 26, 2019

About a dozen participants have signed on to the group so far, Hinds said. Members include representatives from Associated Industries of Massachusetts, the state’s largest employer group, the Massachusetts Business Roundtable, and chambers of commerce from the cities of Worcester and Springfield; left-leaning groups such as the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, a think tank, and Raise Up Massachusetts, a coalition of community, religious, and labor organizations.

MassBudget has new president

Berkshire Eagle, March 21, 2019

Marie-Frances Rivera has been named president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, a non-partisan public policy research organization known for its analyses of the state budget and other policies. Rivera was named interim president in October following the departure of longtime president Noah Berger, but assumed the permanent role after a unanimous vote of the MassBudget Board of Directors earlier this month

Guest Opinion: Now is the time for education funding reform in Massachusetts

Fall River Herald News, March 20, 2019

According to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, the lowest wealth districts spend 32 percent less on classroom teachers than the foundation budget requires. Additionally, the lowest-income 20 percent of districts spend 52 percent below what is recommended on materials and technology. In other words, the districts educating students with the greatest needs are able to provide the least.

A Big Week Ahead for Education in Massachusetts

Public News Service, March 15, 2019

"We have a report out from the New England Board of Higher Education that Massachusetts has the fastest-growing tuition and fees in the whole country for public colleges," he said. "There's a report from the Mass. Budget and Policy Center that we have the second-fastest-growing student debt burden in the country."

Teachers union lobbies for school aid at Cape forum

Cape Cod Times, March 15, 2019

The additional funds are overdue, said Colin Jones, senior policy analyst at the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. “We think of ourselves as an education state,” but the funding formula established by the Education Reform Act of 1993 is hopelessly out of date, Jones said. The first decade after the act was established, local Chapter 70 aid to schools doubled, he said.

Study: Women And People Of Color Are Underrepresented In Mass. Business Groups

WBUR, March 13, 2019

The Eos Foundation study does note some bright spots. A few organizations like the Boston Bar Association and MassBudget have achieved gender parity on their boards, according to the study. And other organizations like The Boston Foundation and the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston have at least 30 percent of people of color on their boards, the study noted.

Women underrepresented at Mass. business groups

Commonwealth Magazine, March 13, 2019

The two organizations with the highest percentage of female board members were the Boston Bar Association, at 56 percent, and the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, at 50 percent. The bar association had a male CEO and board chair, while the budget and policy center had a female CEO and board chair.

Eos, BBJ study shows lack of women CEOs, board members in advocacy groups

Boston Business Journal, March 12, 2019

There are some bright spots, Silbert noted. The Boston Foundation, the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and MassBudget each have more than 30 percent people of color on their boards, and MassInc and the MA Medical society have both a female president and a person of color as board chair.

Immigrant group director to chair key Census committee

State House News Service, March 5, 2019

One in eight households statewide in Massachusetts do not have access to the internet, including cellphone access through a data plan, said Nancy Wagman, KIDS COUNT director at the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. In Hampden County, one in five households do not have access to the internet, she said. Wagman said there are strict privacy protections on information provided as part of the Census, with violators subject to a five-year prison sentence and a fine of up to $250,000. "There are very clear and explicit protections for your data, my data, all of our data, in Census law," she said.

Immigrant group director to chair key census committee

Greenfield Recorder, March 5, 2019

One in eight households statewide in Massachusetts do not have access to the internet, including cellphone access through a data plan, said Nancy Wagman, KIDS COUNT director at the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. In Hampden County, one in five households do not have access to the internet, she said. Wagman said there are strict privacy protections on information provided as part of the Census, with violators subject to a five-year prison sentence and a fine of up to $250,000. “There are very clear and explicit protections for your data, my data, all of our data, in Census law,” she said.

Lawmakers eye revenue issues at forum

Wicked Local Concord, February 27, 2019

Baxandall also urged revisiting about $1 billion in business tax breaks. These include breaks for manufacturing, the film industry or the mutual fund industry that Baxandall said may not be leading to desired job production.

Reduction in state funding for Massachusetts public colleges has increased tuition costs and student loan debt, study finds

MassLive, February 21, 2019

In Massachusetts, state funding allocated $12,500 per public college student in fiscal 2001. By 2018, that figure dropped significantly to $8,500 per student, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Lawmakers want to make film tax credits permanent

Gloucester Daily Times, February 18, 2019

Fiscal policy groups like the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center and the right-leaning Pioneer Institute argue Massachusetts' film tax credit is one of the most generous in the country and should be scaled back and allowed to expire to provide more funding for education, transportation and other needs. "There is no evidence the tax credit can develop a permanent film production industry in the state, one that is not dependent on large tax subsidies to survive," the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center said in a recent report on the tax subsidy. "What is certain is that the high cost of the tax credit limits our ability to invest in other programs with proven track records to build more broadly-shared prosperity in the state."

Charter school's mailings stir some pushback

Daily Hampshire Gazette, February 14, 2019

And, historically, the state has not fully funded reimbursements that aim to help close that gap, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education data show that the state reimbursed, on average, 66 percent of the cost in 2019.

Letter: No to lower wage for teens

Milford Daily News, February 14, 2019

According to a 2017 report by the Mass Budget and Policy Center, average teen wages have contributed 7 percent of the total income of the average family in Massachusetts. For families considered low-income, or in the lowest 20th percentile, that number increases substantially, with teens contributing to 17.7 percent of the total family income. Teenagers are increasingly relied upon to provide income for their families, and reducing the wage that teenagers get will make things much more difficult for families around the state.

Chairs announced to Ways and Means Committee

WGBH, February 14, 2019

Marie-Frances Rivera, the interim president at the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, said the new chairs need to look to higher taxes in order to find money to fund education, affordable housing and climate change preparations. "Without a bold plan to generate substantial new revenue, it'll be difficult for state lawmakers to fully support all the people in the Commonwealth," Rivera said.

At UMass, We Need the Kind of Leadership Money Can't Buy

WBUR, February 11, 2019

Currently, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, Massachusetts ranks a paltry 36th in the nation in terms of per-student state funding for public higher ed. And when it comes to our support of public higher ed as a percentage of total taxable income — ours being a wealthy state and all — Massachusetts ranks an abysmal 45th. So much for our liberal self-image as a pro-education state.

A few districts would benefit greatly from Baker's school funding proposal

Boston Globe, February 10, 2019

“The fanfare and attention [around Baker’s bill] has been high compared to the actual increase in funding,” said Colin Jones, senior policy analyst at the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, a nonpartisan research nonprofit. “It’s not as ambitious as other proposals out there.”

Forum held to discuss underfunded school budgets in Springfield

Western Mass News, February 7, 2019

Coverage of Springfield education forum at which Colin Jones presented findings from his report.

Springfield Education Association forum targets underfunding of public schools

MassLive, February 6, 2019

An independent study conducted by the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center found the state is underfunding Springfield Public Schools by $94 million.

How to Make Mass. Taxes More Progressive

Boston Neighborhood Network News, February 6, 2019

Kurt Wise and Phineas Baxandall, of the Mass. Budget and Policy Center, talk about their new report on how to make the tax burden in Massachusetts more progressive--at a time of growing economic inequality and calls for higher spending in areas such as education. Interview for BNN News. Aired February 6, 2019.

Community groups seek larger role in fighting poverty

Lowell Sun, February 6, 2019

Nancy Wagman, the Kids Count Director at the Massachusetts and Budget Policy Center, gave a presentation on MASSCAP's report "Obstacles on the Road to Opportunity: Finding a Way Forward." The May 2018 report found that anti-poverty policies have long-lasting impacts, and that Massachusetts' public policies have effectively cut poverty in half in the state. However, federal funding cuts impact many state-provided services and recently approved federal tax cuts could put a large dent into funding for services. "This can affect, will affect, might affect Massachusetts," Wagman said. "One out of every four dollars in our state budget is a federal dollar."

Housing crisis fuels homelessness in Massachusetts

South Cost Today, February 2, 2019

Meanwhile, between 1979 and 2014, the median wage for a Massachusetts worker — adjusted for inflation — increased 0.5 percent, according to Mass Budget. And the disparity between wage growth and housing costs keeps some out of the housing market altogether because of upfront costs.

Baker abandons 'no tax' pledge in budget proposal

Gloucester Daily Times, January 25, 2019

Some groups, including the left-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, say the money generated from expanding sales and use taxes under Baker's plan won't be enough to support essential programs. Marie-Frances Rivera, the group's interim director, said while Baker's budget proposal "acknowledges the need for additional resources, it will be difficult for state lawmakers to make important investments without significant new revenue."

Advocates give governor mixed grades on school funding plan

Sun Chronicle, January 25, 2019

“The governor’s proposal on K-12 education funding takes a positive step, but these reforms are gradual and will not go far enough to ensure all our children receive the high quality education they deserve,” the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center said in a statement.

Baker budget calls for education funding overhaul

Sentinel & Enterprise, January 24, 2019

Marie-Frances Rivera, interim President of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, said more revenue was needed than the amount proposed by Baker and said changes to the formula should be implemented within five years rather than seven.

Critics call Gov. Charlie Baker's $1.1 billion education funding plan inadequate

MassLive, January 24, 2019

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, a liberal-leaning think tank, said Baker’s proposal is too “gradual.”

Pressure Points in Baker Ed Bill: $$$, Timeframe, Reforms

State House News Service, January 23, 2019

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center described Baker's reforms as "a positive step" but said they are "gradual and will not go far enough to ensure all our children receive the high quality education they deserve." Interim MassBudget President Marie-Frances Rivera said full implementation would require a funding level of about $316 million a year, and that her group has recommended a five-year timeline.

Editorial: Time to call curtains on the film tax credit

Boston Business Journal, January 23, 2019

Meanwhile, study after study has found fault with the economic impact of the state’s film credit. A 2015 report by the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center found that the state pays significantly more for every job created by the credit than the wages earned by those jobs, and gets just 13 cents in revenue back from every dollar spent.

Globe series exposes dismal reality about Boston schools

Commonwealth Magazine, January 23, 2019

The Baker administration will unveil its proposal today to revamp the state’s education funding formula in conjunction with rolling out its fiscal 2020 spending plan. (Boston Globe) The Massachusetts Budget & Policy Center releases a video explainer on the state of education funding.

Baker’s budget proposal will include changes to education funding formula

Boston Globe, January 22, 2019

Marie-Frances Rivera, interim president of the left-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, said she is watching closely to see whether policy makers pursue “new, progressive sources of revenue” to meet the state’s needs and fill expected revenue gaps. That Baker is embracing a tax hike is promising, she said. “I think we’re hopeful. I think it’s a great suggestion that he is more open than he has been in the past,” Rivera said.

Could Massachusetts Add Over $500m a year to Higher Ed Funding?

Academic Courses, January 21, 2019

Based on information from the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, Massachusetts spent $12,500 per public college student in fiscal year 2001. In 2018, that figure plummeted to about $8,500 per student.

Ed funding problem most acute in low-income communities

Commonwealth Magazine, January 19, 2019

IT’S A PROMISING SIGN that fixing how Massachusetts funds our K-12 schools has moved to the top of the agenda on Beacon Hill. The governor and Legislature acknowledge that the time has come to address the outdated Chapter 70 formula, which has shortchanged students across the Commonwealth, particularly those in middle- and low-income school districts that lack the resources to make up for funding gaps. At stake in this debate is fundamental fairness. If we are committed to giving every kid in the Commonwealth equal opportunity for a world-class public education, then bold action — a real commitment to investing more dollars in public education — is required.

State Rundown 1/18: Governors’ Speeches Kick Off State Fiscal Debates

ITEP, January 18, 2019

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center released a report that lays out 14 options for raising progressive revenue. You can view their innovative ideas here.

Advocates aim to add over $500 million a year to Massachusetts public higher education funding

MassLive, January 16, 2019

According to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, Massachusetts was spending $12,500 per public college student in fiscal 2001. That figure dropped by fiscal 2018 to around $8,500 per student. Overall, the state in fiscal 2001 spent $969 million on public higher education. In fiscal 2019, it spent $1.23 billion. But adjusted for inflation, that actually represents a decrease in funding – from the equivalent of $1.4 billion to $1.23 billion, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Accuracy, citizenship and politics to play role in 2020 Census in Massachusetts

The Fall River Herald News, January 12, 2019

In Massachusetts, federal funding directly affected by census data in fiscal 2019 includes $290 million for special-education grants, $244.4 million for Title 1 grants to local education agencies and $79 million for the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, along with many other programs, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. “The Census affects countless business and government decisions, including the distribution of significant amounts of federal funds to states and localities every year,” wrote Nancy Wagman, Kids Count director at MassBudget in July. “These federal funds help educate our children, they address health and well-being and they help ensure Massachusetts’ children can grow up in well-resourced communities.”

Poverty cycle topic of forum

The Berkshire Eagle, January 11, 2019

Statewide, the average household income is around $96,000 a year. In North Adams and Pittsfield, it's in the mid-$40,000s, according to Nancy Wagman, of the Massachusetts Policy and Budget Center. Wagman explained that the country faced an economic boom after World War II with a steady increase in both economic growth and employee wages through the mid-1970s. Today, however, the economy continues to grow, but middle and lower-earning employees are not seeing the growth in their salaries, she said.

Another Push To Revamp School Funding: Will It Pass This Time?

WBUR, January 9, 2019

The new version of the bill introduces a concept of a "district student aid floor," one that city officials said was informed by projections conducted by the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. In effect, it would put the state on the hook to help districts like Boston that are seeing their promised aid gobbled up by the cost of charter school tuition.

Our View: The benefits of a teen minimum wage

The Milford Daily News, January 7, 2019

“Higher-wage jobs are better jobs, so there’s reduced turnover,” said Jeremy Thompson, a senior policy analyst at Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. “Higher wages lead to increases in productivity. And then, of course, there’s also the increased consumer demand. One thing we know about low-wage workers is they tend to spend their raises in the local economy.”

Our Opinion: New Senate leader may shake up Beacon Hill

The Berkshire Eagle, January 4, 2019

Ms. Spilka's primary fight may come on education funding. The state underfunds education by roughly $1 billion a year, according to a study released last summer by the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, which asserted that the root of the problem is the state's failure to update its 25-year-old foundation budget. For the most, part Beacon Hill accepts these findings, but only the Senate appears to have the will to raise taxes to address a problem that undermines Massachusetts' claims to be at the forefront of education among the nation's states.

'That's What We Fight For': Mass. Minimum Wage Begins Climb To $15

WBUR, January 1, 2019

"For one thing, higher-wage jobs are better jobs, so there's reduced turnover," said senior policy analyst Jeremy Thompson. "[The] second piece is that higher wages lead to increases in productivity. And then, of course, there's also the increased consumer demand. One thing we know about low-wage workers is they tend to spend their raises in the local economy."

Workers to see higher pay from minimum wage hike

Gloucester Daily Times, December 31, 2018

The wage hikes will cost employers more than $817 million in 2019 but will benefit an estimated 662,000 workers, or about 20 percent of the state's workforce, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. The left-leaning research group says the additional money will help support local economies while putting more revenue into the pockets of working-class families.

5 New MA Laws In 2019 That Could Change Your Life

Patch Beacon Hill, December 31, 2018

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center said the total wage increase beginning Tuesday will be $817.5 million for more than 662,000 workers. It will benefit 15 percent of working parents and 79 percent of working teenagers in the state, the report said.

Minimum wage in Massachusetts to rise to $12 an hour starting Jan. 1

Boston Herald, December 30, 2018

An estimated 662,000 workers in Massachusetts will benefit from the wage hike in the new year, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, but business advocacy groups said the pay hike will hamstring small businesses from hiring more workers. Proponents of the higher wages say it means more-efficient workers and less employee turnover, making it easier to recruit and retain workers. Thompson said families “will be better able to support themselves more easily, put food the table, as well as supporting their local economies as a result of the wage increase.”

Minimum wage hike, statewide age for tobacco among new laws

The News Tribune, December 29, 2018

An estimated 662,000 Massachusetts workers will get a pay raise in the new ... senior policy analyst for the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

‘Everybody deserves a living wage’: $12 is the new minimum

Daily Hampshire Gazette, December 29, 2018

New year, better pay. 2019 will bring higher wages for Massachusetts workers. On Jan. 1, the minimum wage will increase from $11 to $12 an hour. Twenty percent of the state’s workforce will see a boost in their wages in 2019, according to an analysis by the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Minimum wage hike, statewide age for tobacco among new Mass. laws

Worcester Telegram, December 29, 2018

An estimated 662,000 Massachusetts workers will get a pay raise in the new year as the state takes the first step toward an eventual $15 minimum wage. The hourly minimum wage increases from $11 to $12 an hour. It will continue to go up in 75-cent annual increments until it reaches $15 in 2023. The subminimum wage for tipped workers, such as restaurant servers, goes up from $3.75 to $4.35 an hour, eventually reaching $6.75 by 2023. “If not for periodic minimum wage increases, hundreds of thousands of the lowest-wage workers in the state would have seen the real value of their wages fall over the past couple of decades,” said Jeremy Thompson, senior policy analyst for the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

How did local legislators vote during the 2017-18 session?

Taunton Daily Gazette, December 29, 2018

According to a new study released by the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, the hike will benefit an estimated 662,000 workers, with a total wage increase of $817.5 million. The study says the hike will give a raise to 68 percent of food service workers and about a third of workers in human services - including human service workers in the fields of child welfare, disability services and elder services. “Minimum wage increases are essential to helping people put food on the table, and they help support the local economies in which workers spend their money,” said Jeremy Thompson, Senior Policy Analyst at MassBudget. “Moreover, if not for periodic minimum wage increases, hundreds of thousands of the lowest-wage workers in the state would have seen the real value of their wages fall over the past couple of decades.”

Greater Newburyport businesses gird for impact of minimum wage hike

The Daily News of Newburyport, December 28, 2018

The hike from $11 to $12 hourly is part of a multiyear, phased-in increase to $15 an hour. It has been predicted that the pay raise would benefit 662,000 workers, for a total wage increase of $817.5 million, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. It has been predicted that 15 percent of working parents in Massachusetts and 19 percent of children in the state will be affected by the $1 minimum wage increase next week. About a third of workers in the human services sector, two-thirds of food service workers, and 40 percent of retail workers will receive raises under the new law, according to the MassBudget analysis.

Will $1 minimum wage jump make a difference for Mass. workers, employers?

Worcester Telegram, December 28, 2018

About 662,000 workers - 40 percent of retail workers, two thirds of food service workers, and a third of workers in the human services industry - are expected to benefit from the $1 wage hike that totals about $817.5 million, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. Massachusetts is among 19 states and 21 cities that will have minimum wage increases Dec. 31 or Jan. 1, according to a National Employment Law Project report just released.

Minimum wage will rise to $12 an hour in Massachusetts on Jan. 1

MassLive, December 27, 2018

According to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, a liberal-leaning think tank, 662,000 Massachusetts workers will see their wages increase this year. That includes workers earning less than $12 an hour, but also some additional workers earning higher wages, because if an entry level worker earns $12 an hour, a more senior employee already making $12 would expect to earn more and will likely get a raise. “It means that people are going to be able to put food on the table more easily, support their families,” said Jeremy Thompson, senior policy analyst at the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. He added that it will also help the economy. “Low wage workers spend the majority of their earnings, and so they’ll spend the majority of their increased earnings on goods and services in their local economies and in Massachusetts,” Thompson said.

Experts weigh-in on minimum wage raise impact

WBZ 1030 News Radio, December 27, 2018

In less than a week, the minimum wage in Massachusetts will go up by a dollar an hour. WBZ NewsRadio's Ben Parker reports on the impact the wage is expected to have

Mass. prepares for minimum wage to rise

MetroWest Daily News, December 27, 2018

As the new year begins, the minimum wage will rise to $12 per hour, followed by 75-cent increases each year, with the state slowly moving to $15 by 2023. The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center predicts that a quarter of the state’s workforce — 840,000 workers — will ultimately see their wages increase as a result.

Next week’s minimum wage hike to benefit 662,000 Massachusetts workers

Worcester Telegram, December 26, 2018

The Jan. 1, 2019, hike from $11 hourly to $12, part of a multi-year phased-in increase to $15 an hour, will benefit 662,000 workers, for a total wage increase of $817.5 million, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. About a third of workers in the human services sector, two-thirds of food service workers, and 40 percent of retail workers will get raises under the new law, according to the MassBudget analysis.

MA. minimum wage hike takes effect Jan. 1

South Coast Today, December 26, 2018

Fifteen percent of working parents in Massachusetts and 19 percent of children in the state will be affected by the $1 minimum wage increase that takes effect next week, according to a new analysis. The Jan. 1, 2019 hike from $11 hourly to $12, part of a multi-year phased-in increase to $15 an hour, will benefit 662,000 workers, for a total wage increase of $817.5 million, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Massachusetts prepares for minimum wage to rise

Boston University News Service, December 19, 2018

As the new year begins, the minimum wage will rise to $12 per hour, followed by 75-cent increases each year, with the state slowly moving to $15 by 2024. The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center predicts that a quarter of the state’s workforce — 840,000 workers — will ultimately see their wages increase as a result.

UMass President Marty Meehan to work with alums and state to lower tuition

The Massachusetts Daily Collegian, December 13, 2018

According to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, since 2001, Massachusetts has cut funding toward higher education by 14 percent. Furthermore, as funding decreases and enrollment increases, per student enrollment has decreased by 31 percent.

Gap cited in after-school programs

Boston Neighborhood Network News, December 10, 2018

Colin Jones of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center and Patrick Stanton of the Massachusetts Afterschool Partnership talk about a new report on a gap in access to after-school programs, especially for students with higher needs.

Trump’s ‘public charge’ anti-immigrant proposal is cruel and unusual

Boston Globe, December 10, 2018

More than 500,000 legal immigrants live in the state and could be affected by the new rule, including close to 20,000 in Boston.

Immigration proposal goes against spirit of Thanksgiving

Wicked Local Provincetown, November 30, 2018

The new rule would require immigrants applying for legal permanent residence (a “green card”) to demonstrate that they have not, do not, and will not likely receive any of a list of publicly funded benefits, including MassHealth (Medicaid) and SNAP (“food stamps”). Analysis by the Fiscal Policy Institute and a recent report by Nancy Wagman at the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center have found that as many as 500,000 people in Massachusetts could withdraw from needed benefits out of fear or confusion about this rule, which has not yet gone into effect. Of these, 160,000 are children, most of whom are U.S. citizens and not even directly subject to this proposed rule.

Beacon Hill Roll Call - November 30, 2018

The Enterprise, November 30, 2018

“Massachusetts state and local taxes, as a share of personal income, are lower than 17 other states and lower than most states in the Northeast.” —Kurt Wise, senior policy analyst at The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Fair workweek proposal panned as bad for customers, taxpayers

Boston Herald, November 29, 2018

Jeremy Thompson, a senior policy analyst with the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, said at the hearing that “fair-workweek laws seem to

Disability rights advocates oppose rule

The Daily News of Newburyport, November 28, 2018

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center said that as many as 500,000 people in Massachusetts could withdraw from federal benefit programs “out of fear or confusion about this rule” and said about 160,000 of the potentially affected individuals are children.

Beacon Hill Roll Call for the week of Nov. 19

Taunton Daily Gazette, November 25, 2018

“Massachusetts state and local taxes, as a share of personal income, are lower than 17 other states and lower than most states in the Northeast.” said Kurt Wise, Senior Policy Analyst at The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Is It Time For The State To Shed Its Taxachusetts Nickname?

Patch Woburn, November 20, 2018

Massachusetts taxes are in line with those levied by other states, according to a new report by the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. For decades the state has had a reputation for high taxes, so much so that it earned the nickname "Taxachusetts." But the policy briefs released by MassBudget Tuesday show that the Massachusetts has cut taxes by 26.2 percent since 1977, more than any other state. "In recent decades, Massachusetts has cut taxes by an extraordinary amount - limiting our collective ability to invest in a range of public programs and services," said Marie-Frances Rivera, Interim President of MassBudget. "We have an opportunity in the coming legislative session to consider how our state can generate, in a fair way, the revenue needed to support state and local services that affect us all."

Baker faces big challenges on education, transportation

Commonwealth Magazine, November 9, 2018

What will be fascinating over the next year is to see how Baker and the Legislature find the money to make those changes. The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center says the cost for the Senate education bill could reach $2 billion, and even the more conservative House version would be close to $1 billion.

Massachusetts’ upside-down tax system

Commonwealth Magazine, November 7, 2018

AT A TIME when people across the state seem to agree that our Commonwealth needs additional resources for public investments, asking those with the highest incomes to contribute a similar share of their incomes in taxes as the rest of us could support major investments to boost prosperity and economic opportunity for all.

Lynn educators and staff to undergo safe and inclusive schools training

Item Live, November 5, 2018

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center’s report, “Excellence for All,” identifies professional development for all staff on how to effectively support English language learners (ELL) as the most important strategy to improve the success of ELL students.

Dempsey and Baxandall: Coming up short on transportation

MetroWest Daily News, October 28, 2018

Want a peek at Massachusetts’ transportation system five years from now? The state’s recently approved capital investment plan (CIP) provides that blueprint, spelling out how much money is set aside through 2023 for specific bridges, roads, public transit, and airports. The $17.3 billion plan says a lot about where we will be improving Massachusetts transportation - and also what will be missing.

Beacon Hill Roll Call takes a closer look at Question 3

Taunton Daily Gazette, October 27, 2018

“Unlike the federal government, Massachusetts relies on a flat income tax and sales taxes. Those with the least income end up paying the greatest portion of it in state and local taxes. It’s like Robin Hood in reverse," said Phineas Baxandall, Senior Policy Analyst of Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center and author of the report “Who Pays.”

Boston-based group stops in Springfield on statewide tour to kick around ideas on ways to end poverty

MassLive, October 26, 2018

About 100 people from human service agencies, education, health care and political realms gathered to hear Nancy Wagman, Kids Count Director of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, present findings from her report "Obstacles on the Road to Opportunity: Finding a Way Forward Together."

Taxes Mark A Key Dividing Line Between Gonzalez And Baker

WBUR, October 25, 2018

"One way would be by asking our highest-income households to contribute their fair share," said Marie-Frances Rivera, with the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. "Right now our state tax system is upside down, so our lowest-income people pay the greatest share of their income in taxes. And as you know the very wealthy households have benefited enormously from economic growth over the past four decades."

Lower Earners In Mass. Carry Bigger Tax Burden: Think Tank

Law360, October 25, 2018

Households in Massachusetts with the lowest incomes contribute a larger percentage of their incomes in state and local taxes than households in the top 20 percent of incomes, according to an analysis from a think tank released Thursday. The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center said the state's overall tax system is regressive, primarily due to sales tax and property tax.

Editorial: The real cost of student loans

Daily Hampshire Gazette, October 17, 2018

The cost of a four-year college education at a public institution has tripled over the past three decades, even when adjusted for inflation, according to The College Board. Meanwhile, U.S. Census data shows that mean family income has increased just under 17 percent in the same timeframe. And public funding at public universities has dropped 14.5 percent in Massachusetts since 2001, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. This is a perfect storm for a crisis.

Poverty topic of community action council forum at Mechanics Hall

Worcester Telegram, October 5, 2018

The forum, “Finding a Way Forward: Greater Worcester,” was co-sponsored by the WCAC and the Massachusetts Association for Community Action, which commissioned a new report called, “Obstacles on the Road to Opportunity: Finding a Way Forward Together.” Report author Nancy Wagman, the “Kids Count Director” of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center spoke to the group. Her report notes that programs that help families make ends meet, like the Earned Income Tax Credit, SNAP, fuel assistance, school lunches, Head Start, and Social Security reduced the number of people in Massachusetts living in poverty by almost half, and reduced the number of children living in poverty by more than half. The programs provided resources for approximately 920,000 people in Massachusetts. But public programs alone can’t eliminate poverty, she said. People need jobs with good wages that increase over time.

Forum on Poverty - October 5th, 2018

Worcester News Tonight, October 5, 2018

Mass. total health coverage stalled

Boston Herald, September 25, 2018

About 19,000 fewer Massachusetts residents had health insurance in 2017 than 2016, according to a new report that found the Bay State still leads the nation in health insurance rates but its progress toward total coverage has stalled. The report from the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center called the 0.3 percent increase in uninsured residents “statistically significant,” and said the number of uninsured Americans rose 0.2 percent over the same time period.

New data shows shifts in income, poverty, insurance levels

WWLP-22 News, September 13, 2018

Median household income in Massachusetts rose by less than 1 percent in 2017, according to new U.S. Census Bureau data, while the state's poverty rate was flat and there was an uptick in people without health insurance. The slight growth in median income "continues a pattern of stagnating wages and incomes among the middle class," said Jeremy Thompson, senior policy analyst at the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center (MassBudget).

At Pittsfield’s urging, Berkshire Hills challenges state school funding formula in strong terms

The Berkshire Edge, September 11, 2018

Advocates for overhauling the foundation budget say the funding gap statewide is between $1 billion and $2 billion. Yon said the faulty foundation budget hits poorer districts like Pittsfield especially hard since they do not typically spend much higher than the minimum budget required by the state.

Personnel File

State House News Service, September 5, 2018

NOAH BERGER, president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center for the past 15 years, plans to leave the organization Sept. 30 and will be succeeded as president by MARIE-FRANCES RIVERA, currently deputy director of MassBudget. "For 15 years, Noah has been dedicated to building MassBudget into a strong, vibrant, and successful organization," MassBudget Board Chair Carol Kamin said in a statement. "His leadership has had a profound impact on creating important research that helped drive critical public policy debates, especially those that affected the lives of lower- and middle-income Massachusetts residents." Berger, who was a top aide to former Senate President Thomas Birmingham, has not decided on his next job. "After 15 years in one position, it's been fun to think broadly about what I want to do next. I plan to take the time to explore all kinds of opportunities both in Massachusetts and at the national level. I look forward to a next chapter of finding new ways to contribute to making life better for everyone in our communities, particularly those who face the greatest challenges," he said. Rivera, a native of New Bedford who is of Afro-Boricua descent, joined MassBudget in 2014. She earned a master's degree in law and public policy from Northeastern University and has an undergraduate degree in business management from Babson College. At the Hyams Foundation, she helped create a racial justice and public policy grantmaking initiative.

Report sets Anti-Poverty Agenda

Boston Neighborhood Network News, August 15, 2018

Joe Diamond, the executive director of MASSCAP (Mass. Association for Community Action), talks about a new report on the state of poverty and how to overcome barriers to greater self-sufficiency. Interview for BNN News. Aired August 15, 2018.

Baker is officially running for reelection. Here’s a fact-check of his first big campaign speech.

Boston Globe, August 14, 2018

“Every year, except for during recessions, the state spends a little bit more on education. But costs go up, also,” said Noah Berger, president of the left-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. “The major education debate in the Legislature this year was about whether to close the gap between what we spend on education and what it would take to provide high-quality education in every district,” he said, referring to a bill that ended up dying in a joint House-Senate committee last month.

Monfredo: When Will The Legislators Update The Foundation Budget?

GoLocal Worcester, August 11, 2018

“Massachusetts leads the country in reading by fourth grade — with about half of our kids proficient readers,” said Noah Berger, who helped develop the original funding formula for public schools back in 1993. Berger is now director of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, a think tank that has argued for more education funding. "Now it's great that we lead the country. But if half of our kids are being left behind, that could have significant long-term negative effects," Berger said. The bottom line is that we need to build an education system that works for everyone and funding reforms are needed to assist all children in the state to thrive.

Commentary: Inaction On School Funding Will Keep Opportunity Gaps In Place

WBUR, August 8, 2018

A recent report from the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center found that the formula – known as the foundation budget – underestimates what districts are spending annually on education by at least $2.6 billion.

What You Need To Know About The Failed Education Funding Bills

WBUR, August 6, 2018

“We lead the country in reading by fourth grade — with about half of our kids proficient readers,” said Noah Berger, who helped develop the original funding formula for public schools back in 1993. "Now it's great that we lead the country. But if half of our kids are being left behind, that could have significant long-term negative effects," Berger said.

Clarence Fanto: On stepping to plate, Legislature didn't always score this session

Berkshire Eagle, August 4, 2018

The House and Senate were unable to agree on how to fix outdated school funding formulas after a report that lawmakers have been shortchanging the state's students by nearly $1 billion a year, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Negotiations Collapse On Education Funding Bill As Legislative Session Ends

WBUR, August 1, 2018

A study published July 18 by the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center — a left-leaning think tank — projected that, if the FBRC recommendations were fully implemented over five years, it would drive nearly $900 million in new state aid to districts across Massachusetts.

State Legislature Fails to Pass Education Funding Reform Bill

WBUR, August 1, 2018

Just before midnight, time ran out on a new education funding bill. The bill would have updated the formula the state uses to determine how much money school districts get from the state.

Legislators reach deal on opioids, but not on health care by end of session

Boston Globe, July 31, 2018

The House and Senate also tried unsuccessfully to reach an agreement on how to revamp the state’s school funding formula. The negotiations, which started in a closed-door conference committee last week, had come after a report, released last month, said that Beacon Hill lawmakers have been shortchanging the education of the state’s students by nearly $1 billion a year.

Edwards seeks full funding for special ed

Greenfield Recorder, July 31, 2018

Jonathan Edwards, one of seven Democrats vying for the 1st Franklin District House seat in the Sept. 4 primary, repeated his call this week for full state funding of special education, citing a recent study by the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. The report concludes that the state has been shortchanging public education by over $1 billion a year for special education as well as $1.5 billion in health insurance benefits. “Over the past 15 years, there has been a significant shift in the balance of state and local funding for our public schools,” the report concludes. “The state is covering a smaller share of total costs and local cities and towns are covering a larger share. Since FY 2002, local support has increased from 59 percent of net school spending to 65 percent. At a time when our state and national economies are strong, when we should be able to make up lost ground in funding our schools, state aid has been stagnant in recent years and is down from historical levels. Chapter 70 aid declined by $378 million (7.2 percent) between FY 2002 and FY 2018 (when you adjust for the inflation factor in state law). In districts that can’t afford to spend additional local resources, budget conditions have grown increasingly strained. Districts that have contributed more from local resources have been able to make progress towards adequate education funding, but it is not clear how sustainable that will be in the next economic downturn.” School districts, it says, have been forced to cut teachers, classroom supplies and technology. “Throughout my 14-plus years on the Whately Selectboard, I’ve advocated for the commonwealth to properly fund special education,” said Edwards. “We now have the data we need to prove what we have known in rural Massachusetts for far too long.

Advocacy Group Produces Study Showing Roadmap to Fix School Funding:Under Five-Year Plan, Revere Could See Up to $18 Million More per Year

Revere Journal, July 28, 2018

Colin Jones of Mass Budget told the Journal that the report – titled ‘Building an Education System that Works for Everyone: Funding Reforms to Help All Our Children Thrive’ – details a plan that would allow the state to increase school aid – specifically to communities like Revere, Everett and Chelsea – by around $200 million per year over a five-year period. That phased approach would lead to restoring what the 1993 education reform law promised, he said. “The big picture is our school funding and the system isn’t really providing the resources that are needed for kids across these Gateway Cities like Revere,” he said. “The formula for funding hasn’t been updated in 25 years and the school districts with the least wealth are facing the worst of it. We looked at the budgets and found that many of these districts are spending 25 percent below what they are supposed to spend on teachers. To make up for it, they have to shift money from other areas or get additional revenues or make cuts to other areas. That’s leading to these big budget gaps.”

Getting it right on boost to school aid

Boston Globe, July 27, 2018

School districts in Massachusetts are underfunded in four areas, a state commission found in 2015. The state’s formula fails to properly account for the cost of health care; of educating children with special education needs; teaching students for whom English is not their first language; and serving the needs of students from low-income families. The commission put forward specific recommendations for closing the gap in two of those four areas. Now, both the House and Senate have passed legislation responding to the commission’s findings, both aimed at boosting state aid to districts. Neither gets it quite right. Broadly speaking, the Legislature ought to be filling all four of the “buckets” — which the House bill fails to do. And it should be ensuring that the money is allocated based on careful analysis of need and that it will be spent wisely by school districts — which the Senate bill fails to do. Neither of them, meanwhile, grapples with where the $1 billion to $2 billion it will cost should come from.

Report: State Lags on Ed-Reform Money

Boston Neighborhood Network News, July 26, 2018

Colin Jones, Senior Policy Analyst with the Mass. Budget and Policy Center, talks about its new report on the lag in state funding needed to help advance education reform in local school districts. Interview for BNN News. Aired July 25, 2018.

Surging costs prompt new approach to school funding

Gloucester Daily Times, July 20, 2018

More than two decades after the state passed a landmark law aimed at narrowing gaps between poor and wealthy school districts, education advocates say education funding is still out of balance. On Beacon Hill, lawmakers are debating changes to the 25-year-old education funding formula that would begin to address those differences, though leaders in the House and Senate remain at odds over increases for schools that teach English language learners and those with large populations of low-income students.

Surging costs prompt new approach to school funding

Gloucester Daily Times, July 20, 2018

More than two decades after the state passed a landmark law aimed at narrowing gaps between poor and wealthy school districts, education advocates say education funding is still out of balance. On Beacon Hill, lawmakers are debating changes to the 25-year-old education funding formula that would begin to address those differences, though leaders in the House and Senate remain at odds over increases for schools that teach English language learners and those with large populations of low-income students.

Under budget pact, business tax breaks will get more scrutiny

Boston Business Journal, July 18, 2018

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center has been among the organizations calling for more scrutiny of corporate tax breaks. Its senior policy analyst, Phineas Baxandall, praised the proposed DOR review on Wednesday. “It certainly provides a regular process to ensure accountability that wasn’t there before,” he said. “This takes us forward in being able to understand how much bang for our buck we’re getting for over $1 billion in spending each year that hasn’t received scrutiny.” A 2016 MassBudget report found that industry-specific tax breaks were costing the state more than $1 billion in annual revenue, nearly triple the total of 20 years prior. The new DOR review process would include tax breaks in addition to those studied in the MassBudget report.

Budget Deal

Bloomberg Baystate Business, July 18, 2018

Noah Berger, President of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, told us about their study which shows the education funding formula in the state is woefully out-of-date. Interview begins around minute 25.

State budget impasse enters third week

The Daily News, July 18, 2018

"The bright side is that we're not seeing the kinds of brinksmanship and efforts to shut down government that we've sometimes seen at the federal level," said Noah Berger, president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. "It's important for lawmakers to get the budget done but in a constructive way."

State lawmakers shortchanging Mass. students, report says

WCVB Boston, July 18, 2018

A new education report accuses state lawmakers of shortchanging Massachusetts students at public schools. The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center says it has the numbers to back up the claim. The group also claims the state has failed to update a 25-year-old formula for financial aid to the more than 300 public school districts in the state. The report says the lack of funding has led districts to layoff teachers, cut school supplies and technology.

State shortchanges public schools by $1 billion a year, report from research group says

Boston Globe, July 18, 2018

Beacon Hill lawmakers have been shortchanging the education of students across Massachusetts by nearly $1 billion a year, causing many school districts to cut teachers, classroom supplies, and technology, according to a report being released Wednesday. The funding shortfall is the consequence of the state’s failure to update its 25-year-old formula for doling out aid to the 322 school districts, which dramatically underestimates what districts are spending annually on education by at least $2.6 billion, according to the report by the left-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center in Boston.

Massachusetts Playbook

Politico, July 18, 2018

“The budget is taking longer than usual, but there have also been years when it has taken much longer. Since the state has enacted a temporary budget and nobody is threatening to shut down the government, it is not that disruptive,” Mass Budget President Noah Berger said in an email.

Morning Edition interview on education funding reform

WBUR, July 18, 2018

Brief on WBUR's Morning Edition featured an interview with Senior Policy Analyst Colin Jones about his report.

Charter school funding formula is broken

Commonwealth Magazine, July 13, 2018

According to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, 14.3 percent of charter school students received special education services in fiscal 2016, while 17.4 percent of students in sending districts received special education services.

House's Trump working group hasn't done much

Commonwealth Magazine, July 6, 2018

However, the Massachusetts House has been largely missing in action when it comes to higher education. The House’s fiscal year 2019 budget contains $1.2 billion in total funding for higher education—a mere 0.1 percent over last year’s spending, itself a 14 percent cut since fiscal year 2001 in real terms. Viewed on a per-student basis, these cuts look even worse: we spend almost a third less per student than we did at the turn of the century.

State lands tax windfall: $1.2 billion more than expected

Boston Globe, July 6, 2018

Noah Berger, president of the left-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, said it would not be prudent for the state to spend the extra money from last fiscal year in the current one. Rather, he said, it should be spent on one-time capital expenses like roads or schools, or put away in the state’s savings account. “The big picture is: Most of this is probably temporary,” he said. “It doesn’t really change long-term challenges like making higher education affordable or rebuilding our transportation systems.”

On the front lines: A look at mental health challenges

The Sun Chronicle, July 6, 2018

The Department of Mental Health’s budget for fiscal year 2019 is about $870 million, up from $772 million last year. The 12 percent increase is significant and is aimed at improving care, according to Budget Monitor, published by Mass Budget and Policy Center. About $84 million will go to “create a new model of service delivery for adults,” authors wrote. “This model aims to provide more coordinated, standardized, and consistent treatment that would be better aligned with health care systems. It would seek to provide more comprehensive care, particularly for people with co-occurring substance use disorders.”

Quincy is changing, but poverty hangs on

Boston Globe, June 29, 2018

Poverty levels were even higher in other Greater Boston cities cited in the study, “Obstacles on the Road to Opportunity: Finding a Way Forward,” conducted by the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. South of Boston, Brockton’s poverty level stood at 18 percent, according to data analyzed from the 2012-2016 American Community Survey. To the west, Framingham had a rate of 11 percent. Nine cities north of Boston had poverty levels that exceeded 10 percent: Chelsea (19 percent), Everett (15 percent), Lawrence (26 percent), Lowell (22 percent), Lynn (20 percent), Malden (15 percent), Revere (13 percent), Salem (15 percent), and Somerville (13 percent). MASSCAP commissioned the study to gauge the effectiveness of antipoverty programs such as the Earned Income Tax Credit, fuel assistance, and food stamps.The report concluded that the programs reduce the number of people living in poverty in Massachusetts by almost half, and the poverty rate among children by more than half.

$15 Minimum Wage, Required Paid Leave Are Coming to Mass., After Gov. Baker Signs 'Grand Bargain'

WBUR, June 28, 2018

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, which advocates for higher minimum wages, has estimated that a quarter of the Massachusetts workforce — about 840,000 workers — would see raises as a result of a $15 minimum wage by 2023.

Massachusetts governor to sign bill on $15 minimum wage

True Viral News, June 28, 2018

An estimated 840,000 workers in the state will see their wages rise, according to The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Gov. Charlie Baker will sign minimum wage 'grand bargain'

MassLive, June 27, 2018

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center estimates 840,000 workers will see their wages rise by 2023 due to the wage increase.

Report: Fed funds for children's programs at risk in 2020 Census

State House News Service, June 27, 2018

Massachusetts ranks second in the nation on child well-being, but government programs that contribute to that status are at risk if the state does not secure an accurate count in the 2020 Census, according to a local assessment of a new national report. Nearly 30 percent of the state's youngest children live in neighborhoods where the Census has had difficulty securing an accurate count, and an undercount could undercut federal funding for programs that serve children and are rooted in population-based formulas, the Mass Budget and Policy Center said. In the Annie E. Casey Foundation's 2018 KIDS COUNT report, Massachusetts ranks first in the nation in health and ensuring children have insurance, second in education based on math and reading data, and 11th in economic well-being. According to the report, the share of children living in poverty in Massachusetts is 14 percent, the same as in 2010, and the number of three-year-old and four-year-old children attending school has stayed the same since 2009-2011. In fiscal 2015, the federal government contributed $281 million toward special education services in Massachusetts, $147 million for the Head Start program and $76.3 million to programs that make child care affordable for working families, according to MassBudget. "If we don't count all children in Massachusetts, we may not get a full picture of their needs," Nancy Wagman, director of KIDS COUNT Massachusetts, said in a statement released by MassBudget. "This could affect the estimates for resources that go to classrooms, that provide health care, and that support other essential programs."

Advocates won’t pursue minimum wage referendum if Baker signs ‘grand bargain’

Boston Globe, June 26, 2018

The left-leaning Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center said increasing the minimum wage to $15 by 2023 would raise the wages of about 840,000 workers.

What does the Supreme Court's Wayfair decision on online sales taxes mean for Massachusetts?

MassLive, June 21, 2018

Noah Berger, president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, a liberal-leaning think tank, said the likely result of the ruling is that Massachusetts' existing rules will take full effect, without the threat of a legal challenge, and more online retailers will begin collecting sales tax in Massachusetts. "The decision is good for Massachusetts and good for states across the country both because it could help to level the playing field between in-state retailers and online retailers and because it will provide revenue for important services in the state, like education and local aid," Berger said.

Current Issues in Massachusetts Taxation Policy: An Interview with Noah Berger of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center and Eileen McAnneny of the Massachusetts Taxpayers Association

MassBenchmarks Journal, June 20, 2018

A MassBenchmarks interview explores current tax policy issues, including current trends in the flow of revenues and increasing costs associated with healthcare, pension, and debt service spending. It also examines the viability of a proposed income surtax on high-income earners, and calls for greater efficiency in state government through greater transparency in the evaluation of spending priorities and trade-offs.

Tuition hikes in offing at UMass Amherst

Daily Hampshire Gazette, June 20, 2018

But, with state funding for UMass remaining largely stagnant while the number of students has grown, that financial gap is getting plugged with steps like tuition hikes and out-of-state enrollment. The state’s public higher education spending has dipped 14 percent since 2001 adjusted for inflation, according to statistics from the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Bloomberg Baystate Business: Millionaires Tax

Bloomberg Baystate Business, June 18, 2018

Noah Berger of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, who favored the tax, talked about how shortfalls in transportation and education funding still exist despite the court’s ruling, and would be impacted heavily if voters lowered the state sales tax without new revenue.

Major funding boost likely for alcohol industry oversight agency

State House News Service, June 14, 2018

According to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, the ABCC's budget has dipped from $2.79 million in fiscal 2009 to $2.49 million this fiscal year.

Despite booming economy, poverty persists on South Shore

The Patriot Ledger, June 12, 2018

“Far too many people are working and making just enough to cover the basics but not enough to thrive,” Kory Eng, chief operating officer for Quincy Community Action Programs, said at a panel discussion Tuesday based on the a new report from the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. “We need public policy that addresses that.” The report, commissioned by Massachusetts Association for Community Action, points to several barriers behind the state’s stubborn poverty rate and highlights great geographic disparities in wealth across Massachusetts and the South Shore. Quincy’s poverty rate, for example, is among the lowest in Massachusetts’ larger cities at 10.2 percent, but double of that of Milton, its next-door neighbor. Poverty rates have been rising in both towns, and in Braintree and Weymouth, since 2000. MassBudget tied today’s persistent poverty directly to those low wages. In Massachusetts, a full-time worker making the state minimum wage of $11 an hour will make about $22,000 a year, which is bellow the federal poverty level for a family of four. Across the board, wages for all but the wealthiest Americans have remained flat on average even as the economy has come roaring back from the Great Recession of the late 2000s. “The economy is growing but now all the prosperity, all that wealth that comes with a booming economy, isn’t going into the pockets of workers,” said MassBudget’s Nancy Wagman.

Special Education Costs Force Some Districts To Cut Elsewhere

wGBH, June 9, 2018

The gap between what the state reimburses districts for special education and what it actually costs amounts to $1.2 billion, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. Districts with strong tax bases can make up the difference on their own, but less wealthy districts have had to cut programs, said Noah Berger, the center's president. “We see that districts are spending less on teachers, for example, which means there are fewer teachers,” Berger added. “So that means either larger class sizes or less specialists like art and music, and that has a direct effect on the quality of education that kids can receive.”

Facing July 1 deadline, negotiators embark on state budget talks

Sentinel & Enterprise, June 8, 2018

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center on Wendesday flagged differences between the branches on health care, housing and education, noting that the House proposed larger investments in early education and care, while the Senate proposed greater funding for K-12 schools. The House also added $5 million for a new program to help homeless individuals move into housing, and the Senate increased Registry of Deeds fees to bolster the Community Preservation Act Trust Fund, which supports affordable housing, open space and historic preservation. On health care, the Senate included language allowing the state to negotiate drug prices directly with manufacturers, a proposal MassBudget said is similar to one introduced by Gov. Charlie Baker. The House, meanwhile, included more funding for pediatric hospitals, adult foster care, and adult day health rates than the Senate, according to MassBudget.

As I See It: A way forward on a road to opportunity

Worcester Telegram, June 8, 2018

Early last month, Worcester Community Action Council, Inc. joined our Community Action partners from throughout the Commonwealth, the Mass Budget Office, United Way organizations and funders to release a new report, “Obstacles on the Road to Opportunity: Finding a Way Forward.” The report estimates that anti-poverty programs have reduced the number of people in Massachusetts who live below the poverty level - $22,000 for a family of four - by more than half. That progress, however, will be undone by the recent federal tax cut and President Trump’s budget projections. These combined actions would cut non-defense discretionary funding, some of which supports anti-poverty programs, from $579 billion today to $306 billion in 2028.

Budget Analysts Flag Housing, Education, Health Care differences

State House News Service, June 6, 2018

State budget negotiators have their work cut out for them as they try this month to reconcile House and Senate spending plans, particularly around education, housing and health care, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. In a preview of the conference committee, MassBudget said the two budgets "reflect similar values" but are both "constrained by limited revenue and are not able to make progress in a number of important areas." Around education, the House proposed about $8.22 billion in spending and the Senate proposed $8.26 billion. But the House focused on early education, while the Senate put more into funding for K-12 public schools. The conference committee, which will hold its first meeting on Thursday, must also decide what to do with the Senate provision requiring a college to give 120 days notice to the Board of Higher Education if it plans to shut down. Negotiators will also have to hash out housing spending and policy difference. The House proposes more funding for the Massachusetts Rental Voucher Program than the Senate, but approved "significantly less" than the Senate for the emergency assistance program that provides shelter for low-income homeless families, MassBudget said. The Senate's plan to increase Registry of Deeds fees to fund the Community Preservation Act Trust Fund will also have to be addressed. Health care spending accounts for almost half of the budget and MassBudget said conferees will have to debate a Senate plan to allow the state to negotiate drug prices directly with manufacturers to obtain rebates and must iron out differences between the House's $20.69 billion in health care spending and the Senate's $20.60 billion. Reps. Jeffrey Sanchez, Stephen Kulik and Todd Smola will meet Thursday morning with Sens. Karen Spilka, Joan Lovely and Vinny deMacedo to begin hashing out the compromise fiscal year 2019 budget. The House passed a $41.065 billion fiscal year 2019 budget and the Senate adopted a $41.49 billion spending plan for FY 2019. - Colin A. Young/SHNS

Fighting poverty as federal aid dwindles

Eagle-Tribune, June 5, 2018

What happens in Washington doesn't stay in Washington,” said Nancy Wagman, the author of a 75-page report she presented at the conference that details how Johnson's War on Poverty cut the national poverty rate from 22 percent to 13 percent within a decade, then stalled in the mid-1970s as the federal minimum wage eroded against inflation and union membership sank. But the greatest threat to the federal programs created by the War on Poverty – including Food Stamps, the Head Start day care program, the LIHEAP heating subsidies and the Earned Income Tax Credit – will come with the tax cut that Congress passed and Trump signed earlier this year, Wagman told the conference. Wagman, a director at the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, a nonpartisan think tank on economic policy issues, wrote the report for the coalition of community action councils, called the Massachusetts Association for Community Action.

Should Massachusetts drop tuition and fees for in-state students at its public colleges and universities?

Boston Globe, June 1, 2018

Thousands of students are unable to afford college and most who graduate are saddled with very high debt. Since fiscal 2001, cuts to public higher education in our state have led to massive growth in average debt for graduates, according to the nonprofit Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center’s report released earlier this year. That debt increased by 77 percent from 2004 to 2016, a rate of growth that was higher than in every state but Delaware. This gives Massachusetts the dubious distinction of having gone from the second-lowest amount of average loan debt in 2004 to having the 10th-highest in 2016. In fact, the average debt among public university graduates almost equals that of private colleges and university graduates in Massachusetts. The truth is Massachusetts has fallen to 45th in what we spend on higher education as a share of our economy.

Finding relief from student debt for human services workers

The Provider, June 1, 2018

Report on page 5 of publication. As I recently wrote about for the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center in Educated and Encumbered, Massachusetts has cut funding for public higher education by 32 percent per student since 2001. Public college and university campuses in Massachusetts depend primarily on two sources for revenue: the state budget, and tuition and fees. When one goes down, the other must go up, and that is exactly what happened: Average in-state tuition and fees across all university campuses have more than doubled since 2001. And that’s after adjusting for inflation. At the same time, we have cut scholarship funding, as well. In 1988, MASSGrant – the state’s largest needbased grant aid program – covered, on average, 88 percent of mandatory tuition and fees. By 2013, MASSGrant covered just 8 percent of these costs. As a result of state budget cuts, tuition and fee increases, and the plummeting purchasing power of need-based aid, the costs of public higher education now fall squarely on the shoulders of Massachusetts students and their families. In 2001, tuition and fees accounted for less than one-third of campus revenues. Today, they constitute more than half of community college revenues. At the four-year University of Massachusetts and state university campuses, the share is around 60 percent.

WBUR Poll: Ballot Questions On Sales Tax Rollback And 'Millionaire's Tax' Maintain High Support

WBUR, May 31, 2018

Noah Berger, president of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, said the debate on the sales tax right now focuses on tax cuts, and not on the budget implications. "If you have a tax cut that costs over a billion dollars, that means that there's less money for local aid, for parks, for education, for health care," he said, "and that part of the debate really hasn't come up." Berger wants greater focus to be on how the proposed sales tax reduction may impact "local communities and services that people count on."

Study shows UMass admissions less competitive for out-of-state students

The Massachusetts Daily Collegian, May 31, 2018

“Today, the state appropriation accounts for only 21 percent of UMass Amherst’s operating budget. Adjusted for inflation, the Commonwealth’s spending on public higher education has declined by 14 percent since 2001, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. In this same period, because the number of students has grown, the per-student spending has decreased by 31 percent,” Blaguszewski said in a MassLive article,

Tuition from out-of-state students needed to fund UMass due to 'stagnated' state funding, school officials say

MassLive, May 30, 2018

"The university's enrollment of out-of-state students has increased as state support for UMass has stagnated," UMass spokesman Ed Blaguszewski said. "Today, the state appropriation accounts for only 21 percent of UMass Amherst's operating budget. Adjusted for inflation, the Commonwealth's spending on public higher education has declined by 14 percent since 2001, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. In this same period, because the number of students has grown, the per-student spending has decreased by 31 percent."

GUEST VIEW: Sales tax cut would threaten already-struggling public college system

South Coast Today, May 29, 2018

Massachusetts has cut state higher education funding by almost one-third per student since 2001, raising tuition and fee costs by thousands of dollars and reducing access to public higher education. This has led to a massive increase in student debt burdens for students and their families — student debt has risen faster here than in 49 other states since 2001, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center.

Budgets, Markets, Taxes

Bloomberg Baystate Business, May 29, 2018

Noah Berger, President of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center was with us to counter yesterday’s Pioneer Institute rebuttal of their new study on the proposed millionaire’s tax.

UMass Amherst Holds Higher Admission Standards For In-State Students, Study Finds

WBUR, May 29, 2018

Adjusted for inflation, the Commonwealth’s spending on public higher education has declined by 14 percent since 2001, according to the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center. In this same period, because the number of students has grown, the per-student spending has decreased by 31 percent. Massachusetts now ranks 43rd in spending on public higher education as a percentage of personal income.

At UMass Amherst, admission easier for out-of-state applicants

Commonwealth Magazine, May 29, 2018

The state’s public higher education institutions have faced a double squeeze in recent years: declining state aid amidst increasing enrollments. Not only has state aid to public higher education declined, as the Mass. Budget and Policy Center reported in March, because enrollment in the state system has increased, the cuts led to an even larger 32 percent decrease in funding per enrolled in-state student during that time. “If those budget pressures are also making it harder for qualified students from Massachusetts to get into UMass, that’s an additional reason to make sure our higher education system is properly funded,” said Noah Berger, president of the liberal-leaning think tank. He said the cuts – and accompanying increases in tuition and fees at UMass – have come in the wake of a series of large tax cuts enacted in 2001.

Panel analyzes ways to increase opportunities through wages and social programs

Spare Change News, May 25, 2018

A report outlining the effects of social programs and removing barriers for low-income individuals and families was discussed at a recent panel discussion hosted by Action for Boston Community Development in Dorchester. The “Obstacles on the Road to Opportunity” report, sponsored by the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center and Massachusetts Association for Community Action, concluded that wage growth and reinvestment in social programs could help close the inequality gap.

The Mount Ida Rorschach test

Commonwealth Magazine, May 25, 2018

A report from the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center calculates that, adjusted for inflation, the Commonwealth’s spending on public higher education is 14 percent lower than it was in 2001. Because the number of students has grown, the per student spending has decreased by 31 percent. This means that the cost of supporting public institutions has shifted significantly from the state to the enrolled students. They pay tuition and fees totaling 61 percent of the institutional budgets, more than double the previous level.

Tax cuts that continue to haunt Mass

Boston Globe - Op-Ed, February 12, 2013

Tax policy debates are about how we pay for the things we do together for our communities, our families, and our economy. Working together through government allows us to accomplish things that are vital to us as a Commonwealth and that we can't do alone...About 15 years ago, at the height of the dot-com bubble, our state made tax policy choices that have shaped state policy ever since...The state enacted a series of cuts to the income tax that are now costing us close to $3 billion a year. We cut the tax rate on most income from 5.95 percent to 5.3 percent, costing over $1.5 billion. We cut the tax rate on dividends and interest from 12 percent to 5.3 percent, costing about $850 million. We increased the personal deduction to $4,400, costing $550 million.

Look at what the state is doing right

Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, January 23, 2011

WITH THE governor scheduled to file his budget proposal for the coming year on Wednesday, and the Commonwealth facing a budget gap of close to $2 billion, knowing that our government provides services as efficiently as possible will be more important than ever.